May 22

10 Unique Foods For Strong Bones (By Experts!)

(This is a repost of an interview with Kelly; original article click here) Nutrition / Osteoporosis / May 19, 2017

Foods for Stronger Bones

You know about milk, cheese, and greens being crucial foods for strong bones.

But there are others you may have never thought of that could improve your bone density too.

That’s why we asked 10 experts the following question:

What unique (often overlooked) food do you recommend for strong bones?

It’s all part of our National Osteoporosis Month campaign to spread awareness of this “silent” disease.

Discover what foods you may be overlooking that can support your bones!

And while you’re at it, enter our giveaway to win a 6-Month Supply of AlgaeCal Plus and Strontium Boost below!

plain yogurt - foods for strong bonesLara Pizzorno

 

Lara Pizzorno, MDiv, MA, LMT.

Lara Pizzorno is the author of “Your Bones: How You Can Prevent Osteoporosis and Have Strong Bones for Life – Naturally” and a member of the American Medical Writers Association with 29 years of experience specializing in bone health.


# 1 Full Fat, Organic Plain Yogurt

Full-fat, organic plain yogurt from pastured cows. Dairy foods, particularly yogurt, deliver the widest range of beneficial nutrients for our bones – IF, and this is crucial IF, the yogurt consumed is full fat, organic plain yogurt produced from the milk of pastured cows.  

Plain yogurt (that meets these criteria) will provide not only calcium, but magnesium and zinc, plus small amounts of vitamin K2 (in the form of MK-4), vitamin A, and vitamin D (as most cow’s milk is now fortified with vitamin D, one cup of yogurt per day provides 200 IU of vitamin D3 along with 400 mg of calcium) — and a hefty dose of protein.

In addition, organic, full-fat plain yogurt from pastured cows will contain beneficial bacteria that protect the gut, greatly improving our digestion and absorption of all the nutrients bones require. And lastly, once established in our intestines, the probiotic bacteria provided by yogurt will produce the B vitamins we need to support a healthy cardiovascular system, nervous system, and energy metabolism – as well as healthy bones.

Low-fat yogurt, even if organic, will not contain the fat-soluble vitamins, K2 or A.  Non-organic yogurt, even if full fat, will contain pesticide residues, possible hormone, and antibiotic residues, GMO sugars & a variety of chemical additives – all of which may harm bone via a wide variety of mechanisms.

Many studies show a significant inverse association between consumption of dairy products and elevated markers of bone turnover (indicators of excessive bone loss) and a positive association between dairy food intake and bone mineral content.

protein powders - foods for strong bones

Christal Sczebel

Christal Sczebel, C.H.N., R.M.T.  

Christal is the owner & Nutritionist, Nutritionist in the Kitch Pure & Simple Nutritional Consulting.

She is a Certified Holistic Nutritional Consultant (C.H.N.C.), Registered Massage Therapist (R.M.T.), and educated in Personal Fitness Training.


#2 Protein Powders

Protein powders have been popular for ages, but unfortunately, there are many on the market that contain additives and artificial ingredients. However, fortunately, there are protein powders available now that are made from Bovine collagen. These collagen peptide protein powders contain no added ingredients and dissolve wonderfully into many recipes. Collagen peptides are rich in amino acids which help to strengthen our bones and joints! Collagen peptides can be found in powdered forms in specialty grocery stores like Whole Foods or online (Amazon, etc.).

black beans - foods for stronger bones

Stacy E Davis

 

Stacy E. Davis, NCCAOM (Acupuncturist).

Stacy completed her Master’s of Science in Oriental Medicine in 2007 and maintains her NCCAOM certification as well as her licensure through the state of New Mexico.

 A Wyoming native, Dr. Stacy Davis has practiced acupuncture for 10 years.

 


#3 Black Beans and Kelp

In Chinese medicine, we look at vitality (what we call Jing) as coming from our kidneys. As we age, we use up our Jing, and we start to see signs that we associate with aging: graying hair, weak knees and back, and weaker bones.  Interestingly, in western medicine, the kidneys play a role in bone health as well; healthy kidneys turn vitamin D into an active hormone (calcitriol), which helps increase calcium absorption from the intestines into the blood. So, from my perspective, when I look to strengthen bones I look to strengthen the kidneys.

There are two foods I recommend, depending on other signs and symptoms a patient might have. The first is black beans. In Chinese medicine, when we look at food, we look at the “energy” of that food. You might think of this as the nature of the food. Most legumes are considered good for the kidneys because they are the pure Jing or vitality of the plant. When you eat beans you consume that vitality. Additionally, black beans contain about 135 mg of calcium per half cup serving.

Foods that are naturally salty are also considered nourishing for the kidneys, so the second food I would consider is kelp. The slightly fishy flavor of kelp can turn some people away, so I like to use kelp granules as a salt replacement on fish and eggs and in soup.

dried plums - foods for strong bones

John La Puma

Dr. John La Puma, M.D. F.A.C.P.  

Dr. La Puma has led clinical trials of nutritional interventions designed to improve obesity, hypertension, osteoarthritis, insomnia and diabetes, and pioneered culinary medicine.

His mission is to help you get measurably healthier with what you eat and how you live.

 


#4 Prunes

Prunes, or as their marketing board says, dried plums, are effective in both preventing and reversing bone loss in postmenopausal women. People who eat the most foods rich in vitamin C (such as citrus fruits and some stone fruits, like plums) have 70% less cartilage loss than those who eat the least and a threefold reduction in the progression of the disease.

Osteoarthritis (“wear and tear arthritis”), the most common type of arthritis in the U.S., is a painful degenerative condition that occurs when cartilage (which cushions bone joints) become cracked and pitted. It is estimated that 80% of the population will have osteoarthritis by the age of 65, although almost half of those people will not have any symptoms.

bone broth - foods for stronger bones

Kelly O Schmidt

 

Kelly O. Schmidt, R.D.N., L.D.N.

Fueled by passion and driven by greatness, Kelly educates and empowers her clients to reach their best health.

Kelly has been featured in Men’s Health, SELF, Glamour and more!

 


#5 Bone Broth

Hands-down, bone broth. Bone broth is one of the healthiest foods we can consume daily. Most importantly, bone broth is rich in two very special amino acids: proline and glycine, as well, it’s rich in vitamins and minerals, and antioxidants (especially calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus). Consumers can use bone broth in cooking vegetables, stir fry’s or even sip it like tea. I like to make a large batch of bone broth, freeze it in icecube trays and pop out a few cubes for cooking.

Continue to full article

May 17

Food Holidays

Food holidays are quite frankly funny. The best one I have celebrated lately was “National Lima Bean Respect Day.” I mean, I will respect any whole real food that offers good nutrition, wouldn’t you?!

On April 20th I did a food demonstration and touted the benefits of lima beans on our local news station here in Columbus, OH. This recipe was featured on Fox 28 Good Day Columbus.

If only my co-host on the News enjoyed lima beans as much I did! Where was her respect?

 

 

May 15

National Apple Pie Day

This past weekend wasn’t only Mother’s Day, but it was also National Apple Pie Day. On this very day, May 13th, I had the pleasure of demonstrating an allergen-friendly recipe on the local Columbus, OH 10TV News. 

Allergen Friendly Apple Pie

Ingredients:
• 2 Wholly Wholesome 9″ Gluten Free Pie Shell
• 6 medium sized granny smith apples, sliced
• 1/2 cup coconut sugar – or reduce total amount and use maple syrup
• 1 Tbsp. cinnamon
• 2 Tbsp coconut oil, melted
Directions:
1. Mix sugar and cinnamon together in a large bowl. Peel, core, and slice apples, and place in a Wholly Wholesome Gluten Free Pie Shell. The apples will be piled high but will cook down in the oven. Sprinkle sugar/cinnamon mixture over apples.
2. Spoon coconut oil and place on top of apples. Add second pie shell over apples and crimp pie edges. Poke a hole in top crust to allow air to escape during baking. Place pie on a sheet pan and bake in a preheated oven at 375° for 30 minutes or until top is browned. You will know the pie is done when a paring knife can be easily inserted into the center and the apples are tender.

Apr 28

Glucose Meters – How Accurate Are They?

I test my blood a lot. If I had to put money on it, I believe I average 8-10 finger pricks a day. Even with a continuous glucose monitor (CGM), I double check my levels every time (okay most times) I eat, feel off and/or need to calibrate. However, I find it interesting when I test my glucose seconds apart, my meter doesn’t always tell me the exact same readings.

Admittingly, I do not wash and dry my hands everytime before testing (yes it matters), but even when I am well-groomed in the process, two readings can be 5-15 mg/dl different. Sometimes the difference is even more, and if that is the case, I will test a third time. But which glucose reading do I believe? Often I go with what the second reading is (if I am using the same poked finger) or I do a quick average of the two. Overall, if I test and get a number that doesn’t relate to how I am feeling, I test again.

Besides washing my hands, I try to ensure the test strips are stored in a cool dry place, the lancet is new (I struggle here) and I try to measure my meter’s accuracy, comparing it to a lab at my endo appointment, once a year.

Thankfully, the technology of blood sugar control is getting better and as of 2016 the standards for all new meters were heightened:

  • 95% of all measured blood glucose meter values must be within 15% of the true value,
  • 99% of meter values must be within 20% of the true value,
  • research on new meters must include at least 350 people with diabetes, larger than previously required, and
  • they require greater hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) accuracy than the 2013 ISO standard.

Putting this into practical terms, if the true glucose value is 100 mg/dl, the over the counter meter has to be within 15 mg/dl (85-115 mg/dl) in 95% of cases, and within 20 mg/dl (80-120 mg/dl) in 99% of cases.

For healthcare facilities using glucose meters, a separate guidance has been issued, but with similar standards.

Overall, this is raising the bar to get new, better meters to the market. As of late, my strongest recommendation for clients with diabetes is to move towards the meter from OneDrop. Not only does the meter prove to meet the guidelines, but the price for strips is very economical, and the data transfers automatically to an app where it can be analyzed and shared with a community (if preferred). Please note, I get no kickback from this recommendation, other than providing my clients a tool to better control.

Great things happen when things are accurate and newer meters are another tool to a better A1C%.

 

 

Apr 03

The Autoimmune Fix

I leap to the opportunity to listen to Dr. Tom O’Bryan, DC, CCN, DACBN speak. When his most recent book came out, “The Autoimmune Fix,” I grabbed a copy and had a hard time putting it down. This book is a well-written, scientifically-sound, explanation about how to stop the hidden autoimmune damage that keeps you sick, fat and tired before it turns into a disease.

Even someone with an autoimmune disease for over 25 years (me!), and as a nutrition expert, there were heaps I learned. A few stats I noted include:

  • The premier neurologist in the world specializing in the impact of gluten sensitivity on the brain, with or without celiac disease, is Mario Hadjivassiliou, MD, who believe gluten sensitivity is associated with autoimmune disease and that celiac disease is the just manifestation of it. What does this mean? Gluten sensitivity is something to be taken so seriously.
  • Gluten sensitivity is an initiator to many systemic autoimmune diseases; this doesn’t mean everyone with an autoimmune disease has a gluten sensitivity, but there is a very high correlation. Applying this stat to my practice in helping 100s of clients, all of them have felt better on a gluten free diet. This doesn’t mean wheat bread is equally exchanged for gluten free bread. Real food is encouraged.
  • Dr. O’Bryan has shared some valuable articles: “The Conundrum of Gluten Sensitivity and Autoimmunity – What Tests Are Often Wrong,” and a bonus guide, “The Hidden Sources of Gluten, ” at GlutenandAutoimmunity.com.
  • Many people with the genes for celiac disease or non-celiac wheat sensitivity may lead their entire lives without ever developing the symptoms of the disease. For some, the symptoms are immediately apparent, where others it take years or decades to appear. Some are able to eat gluten filled foods until symptoms arise and they have lost their oral tolerance, activating the genes, producing antibodies, leading to developing the disease. Researchers have also found that celiac has doubled every 15 years. This is tough, but the great news is it shows that we can control our own health. If we know the mechanism by wich a disease develops, it gives us the chance to reverse engineer the direction we’re going and move toward a higher level of health.
  • “Throughout life, the most profound influences in health, vitality, and function are not the doctors you see or the drugs, surgery, or other therapy you’ve undertaken. The most profound influences are the cumulative effects of the decisions you make about your diet and your lifestyle, and how those decisions affect the expression of your genes.” – Jeffrey Bland, PhD
  • It takes 17 years for the latest research to trickle down to clinical practice. New research about the autoimmune spectrum is coming out every day, but most doctors don’t simply hav
    e the time to read it.
  • Patients with Hashimoto’s thyroid disease can reduce their dose of thyroid hormone medication (with their doctor’s permission, of course) by 49 percent by eliminating gluten fromtheir diet.*
  • When Infants are high risk for type 1 diabetes (from a family history), parents are advised to avoid feeding their baby all cow’s milk products for the first year of life. The reason is the vulnerability to produce islet cell antibodies if you are sensitive to milk.
  • If a problem is sensed, it’s advised to get a Multiple Autoimmune Reactivity Screening done. If a doctor won’t do the test, one can be ordered from theDr.com.
  • More than 80% of all processed foods, such as vegetable oils and breakfast cereals, contain genetic modifiedingredients.
  • To watch a powerful video and learn more about gut health and how the microbiome works, go to GetYourGutTested.com.

*References:

C. Virili et al. “Atypical Celiac Disease as Cause of Increased Need for Thyroxine: A Systemic Study,” Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism 97, no3 (Mar 2012) E419-22.

Mar 28

Get Moving for Your Mood

Our happiness is predetermined ~ 50% by genes. This leaves us with a huge opportunity to take action to smile, or want to smile, more often. Overall our brain is like a muscle, the more we influence happiness, the more likely or more easily it can be to attain. You see, happiness is part of a chemical process of neurons and dopamine receptors. If we don’t exercise doing things that enlighten our mood, those receptors can decrease with time and age.

Thankfully here we can hit 2 birds with one stone here! Aerobic exercise is one of the best ways to improve mood. Not only can we look at activity for fitness, heart health, and weight loss, but overall we can improve our happiness and mental health too.

Therefore, maybe weight loss should move to way wayside, and overall mental and physical health should be capitalized? Not a bad idea and research proves that focusing on health, in general, is better and more productive than focusing on losing weight.

As someone with diabetes, exercise impacts my blood sugar control, but that doesn’t hold me back from doing interval training, yoga and heavy lifting weekly. Also, I asked a few friends from “Females with Type 1 Diabetes, Type 1 Diabetic Athletes Group, DMs Supporting DMs,” Facebook communities what their activity looks like, and this is what they had to share:

I have played soccer before and after my diagnosis, and crossfit 5-6 times per week. Crossfit keeps my blood sugar more level than soccer ever did! The most significant differences that I notice are overnight readings. My insulin sensitivity is very manageable as I am more aware working out… When I am not active or in the past when I have not been working out, it was much harder to notice my insulin sensitivities! Being active and staying fit has changed my life incredibly! My diabetes is pure motivation to get to the gym when I can hardly stand to do anything that day! It has really pushed me to have the desire to see within range blood sugar numbers and I know that being active is the only way I will accomplish that. Type 1 diabetes using the Medtronic 530g! Diagnosed for 10 years and 7 months! – Katelyn Partridge 

I start every day with a 2-mile walk with my dog. Then after working 8 hours depending on the night I play racquetball, tennis, do Zumba or yoga. In the winter I ski on the weekends. In the spring and summer, I do distance cycling. Exercise has helped me lose weight, maintain decent blood sugar control and it makes me more sensitive to insulin. Besides that it makes me feel good. Omnipod pump and a Dexcom. Type 1, dxed May 1975. – Clare T. Fishman 

I’ve been t1 for 24 years and got a Dexcom 2.5 years ago. It really helps with hiking. You can see a drop coming before it happens and eat some glucose to maintain nice flat lines. – Kate Sullivan 

I was a competitive dancer most of my youth and started really working out again two years ago. It changed my life and I started to feel strong and empowered again—my insulin needs dropped from 75 units a day to 45 units a day and I’ve been on a pump for 14 years…as I realized I could workout with diabetes as I had a fear that it would hold me back I found a passion in running and have now completed 5ks, 10ks and working towards my first half marathon this spring! I realized when I believe in myself, I can do anything I set my mind to. Diagnosed with Type 1 on st patty’s day 1997. – Amanda Jolene Smith 

Grew up racing BMX and mountain bikes nationally, competed in fitness competitions for a few years and now do CrossFit 4-5 times a week and stay active with my kids! Competing and exercising with diabetes can be tricky, but if you watch your patterns closely, with trial and error you can figure it out. Building muscle and staying consistent has been the best for me with managing diabetes! Also, this was crucial for two heathy pregnancies with diabetes too! Type 1 for 25 years since age 14, currently on Medtronic pump and CGM. – Allison Sigler MacKenzie 

I make it a point to exercise at the gym at least 3 (but I shoot for 5) days a week, with “active rest days” the rest of the week. Anything more than a gentle walk means I have to take extra insulin, but it’s totally worth it. Besides the benefits to my physical health, I dervive huge mental health benefits, too. When living with a chronic disease, we have to take every opportunity we can to feel good about ourselves, and to feel strong. This is how I keep my head up, and keep going on. I’m looking forward to rocking the NEXT 31+ years, whether they find a cure, or not. I got this! T1 for 31 years (pump/CGM), and active for 2 years… – Dana Coltrinari Burke 

I run 5-8 miles almost every day. On days I don’t run, my numbers are all over the place. I also do yoga and stretching almost everyday. The mental health benefits from the endorphin release and clearing of my mind is equally as important in managing this disease. Diagnosed 3.5 years ago, at age 51. I use both the Omnipod and a CGM. – Stacey Boehrer 

I mostly run, 3-5 days a week. Running has helped me reduce the amount of insulin I need to take and makes me more fit, which in the long run will add years to my life. I was diagnosed at age 5, 33 years ago. I use an Omnipod pump and Dexcom G5 CGM. – Matt Barnett  

“Control diabetes. Don’t let it control you” I had amazing parents who went through training and extreme patience when they first had to give me insulin and figure out the diet. We were an active family already so it was a little easier. Its crucial to have the support of your family and friends especially if newly diagnosed. It’s a complete lifestyle change! For those of us who’ve known nothing else it’s a little easier to transition through each phase. I tried the cgm for a week but due to the way the alarms were set, I went super high and super low due to overcorrections or overeating. For me it’s hard to change what’s been working- low carb meals, lots of protein and fresh fruits and vegetables, exercise includes walking the dogs, running, playing with the kids, swimming, tennis, basketball and whatever comes in front of me.Type I diabetic for 32 years- only on the pump for the past 7 years. My A1c has been between 5.7-6.5 for the past 10 years but my goal is to get it back to 6.0 or under. – Joella Davis 

The formula for happiness is not the same for all of us, but figuring out what we enjoy is key. Go out and play and make time for personal play. When this is easier said than done, I make a gratitude list on paper or in my head, and quickly realize, “I’m too blessed to be stressed.” Or at least overly stressed. 🙂

 

Feb 23

Hormones

What do you get with 1 pregnancy, followed by 10 months of nursing, followed immediately with a second pregnancy, and then 12 months of nursing? One wild ride on a 40 month plus hormone train.

Hormones are fragile, essential, frustrating and amazing all in one. They are often overlooked, but crucial to our health, and a wellness plan. Signs and symptoms of hormonal imbalance include an inability to lose weight, weight gain, cravings, mood swings, brain fog, sleep troubles, excess fatigue, PMS, acne, low tolerance to stress, excess weight around the mid-section and or hips and thighs, and low sex drive, to name a few. This laundry list of symptoms is one that many consumers share, but starting now there are things we can do to improve the hormonal imbalance.

The fist step in finding relief begins with lifestyle and removing the problem(s), beginning with hormone disruptors. These include:

  • Birth control
  • Plastics – coming from Ziplock bags to water bottles, shower curtains, etc. And plastic is tough on our endocrine system beyond BPA. Items will be marketed BPA free, but that doesn’t mean the problem is fixed. Opt for glass water bottles, storage containers, silverware and wash all the kiddie plates/sippy cups verse cleaning and heating them in a dishwasher. Research shows that even low-dose exposure can be harmful. From altered immune function to stimulating cancer, BPA and the likes are not worth it.
  • Skip canned foods, even if it says BPA-free. Opt for frozen, fresh or dried versions for what you need in a meal or recipe. Also, go green and ask for receipts to be sent to your email when possible. Holding a receipt for 5 seconds can transmit endocrine disruptors through the skin.
  • Chemicals in makeup and body/shower products, cleaning supplies, fragrances, detergents, etc. Have you ever read the ingredient list on the products you use on your body and hair? It’s worthwhile as we absorb up to 60% of what we put on our skin. This is especially true for that product we want to work 24/7: deodorant.
  • Hygiene. Wash hands, avoiding fragrance and antibacterial hand soaps, every time before eating.
  • Conventionally grown produce. I had a client comment to me how odd it is that her mouth itches every time she eats an apple that isn’t organic. I echoed how this symptom is uncomfortable, but not far from the norm. Our food is sprayed with pesticides, herbicides and can be contaminated with industrial runoff. As much as possible, buy and eat organic and free-range food to limit exposure to such chemicals.
  • Filtered water is far safer and healthier than tap. Tap water can be contaminated with lead to birth control residue. Filter water for drinking and for bath and shower water.

Secondly, give your liver some love. The liver is not only the fat burning organ but also a detoxing machine. Methods, to nurturing your detox pathways include:

  • supplement wisely (high-quality probiotics, herbs, evening primrose oil, Chaste Tree, methylated vitamins*)
  • eat more real food, grown in nature, than packaged,
  • eat clean protein sources,
  • sweat weekly,
  • drink half of your weight in ounces of clean water, every day,
  • nurture your gut health,
  • stabilize blood sugars,
  • eat balanced meals with animal protein, healthy fat and high-fiber carbohydrates,
  • once diet becomes consistent and balanced, do a reputable food-based cleanse.

Last, but not least, get into the right mindset. Stress competes with sex hormones, and if you ar chronically under stress, your other efforts in regulating hormones are nearly a wash. A few things I recommend: start the day with a list of things you are grateful for. You can do this in your head, or better yet, whip out a journal. Today I am grateful for my children’s smiles, for my insulin pump and my iPhone, so I can Facetime and easily connect with my husband while he is traveling. At the end of the day, in bed, run through some winnings you had for the day. Last night I listed out 1) my blood sugar never went over 151 mg/dl, 2) I had a badass workout, 3) I had some really good client interactions, 4) I fueled myself with a lot of nutritious food, and my kids ate decently too. Getting my kids excited about some of the foods I make them, becomes an art and a balancing act.

Stress isn’t bad, but if we can’t manage it, it becomes harmful. Reel it in, use it to help you grow, and let go of what you can. Get plenty of rest and go live your fullest life, being patient with your journey. Balancing hormones can take 3-6 months on average, but it depends on the case and level of commitment.

Cheers to you and good health,

Kelly

 

*Vitamins are tricky. Bottom-line you want to source vitamins that are pharmaceutical grade and sold from a health practitioner. Supplements are not FDA regulated and you want to be careful with what brands you trust. Getting supplements from a health practitioner is the best method to know you are supplementing correctly and getting a high-quality end product. If you need help, flick me an email at [email protected]

 

 

 

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Diabetes and Womanhood

Jan 28

Matters of the Heart with Diabetes

“Pain nourishes courage. You can’t be brave if you’ve only had wonderful things happen to you.” -Mary Tyler Moore

I cried last night (when I learned the news of MTM). Numerous times actually. Never before have I been so taken back when an icon and public name had passed. Mary Tyler Moore was and is different. She was dynamite; she was a force to be reckoned with and a voice for raising money and awareness for type 1 diabetes. She was beautiful inside and out, and I am not the only one saying this. She made an impression on millions, including Oprah.

With Mary’s passing I am reminded what it means to have diabetes. Pain does nourish courage, and every day we are brave to carry on what we do. Those of us with diabetes wear many hats. We are consumers, scientist, nutritionist and humans wrapped into one. Yes, there are some scare tactics with this disease, but on the flip side, diabetes is a reminder to embrace my body and health. I am constantly consciously and subconsciously asking myself how I feel and if I need to take action to improve my blood sugar. Diabetes is a daily reminder to live in the moment and to make the day count. 

 
For the last few years, especially since I was welcomed to motherhood, I remind myself to ease up, be brave and to focus on the blessings:
  • I am alive, and thriving after 25 years of being diagnosed with diabetes. This is a miracle compared to those diagnosed before insulin was discovered, let alone made in a lab.
  • I have children. When I was diagnosed on my eighth birthday, I always toyed with the idea that I would have to adopt to have kids.
  • I am so in love with my profession, as a dietitian. I am driven to be the best health coach out there. Diabetes has helped me be in tune with my body, and understand the power of nutrition. It’s given me my drive, my empathy, my passion.

This is a small list, but there is a positive having diabetes. Furthermore, I strive, and recommend others to have grace, build confidence in your choices, and to be in charge of your lifestyle. Doing so, you can put our best foot forward to feel your best, and have the best day of your ability, which plays into the best possible life.

To get the ball rolling, we need to be motivated, and that can come from many different areas. Take a moment and ask yourself where you can get such inspiration. Maybe here on this website?

This week, I picked up a new podcast, Colorful Eats, hosted by a fellow type 1, Caroline. In a recent episode, she really spelled out the meaning of giving grace. The definition is along the lines as a smooth and pleasing way of moving, or a polite and thoughtful way of behaving.

Focusing on the latter part, it’s so easy to get busy in our modern world, regardless of having diabetes, BUT it’s important to slow down, grab life by the horns, breath and notice things, be polite to yourself, your diabetes and be more thoughtful with your actions. No doubt, I more than get it. Managing my health can be frustrating, but trust me: thank your body for what it does and make lifestyle choices that your body appreciates. Something as big or small as the following:

  • End every day by drinking hot tea, and an occasional hot bath,
  • Drink water upon rising, and eat breakfast shortly after,
  • Eat more food from the earth, not a package,
  • Don’t fear healthy fats and have high quality protein at each meal,
  • Measure your carbs, and assess what amount of carbs at each meal allows you to feel your best,
  • Aim to eat more vegetables, and even try to tackle 8-10 cups a day,
  • Be consistent with your medication and blood sugar monitoring regime,
  • Relax, take more small breaks,
  • Be confident with your food choices, and be consistent,

Above all, give grace to what makes you happy and don’t judge setbacks. Move on, learn what you can and surround yourself with positive people you love.

Mary Tyler Moore was more than just a beloved American role model, she really did turn the world on with her smile and has highlighted how tough and brave we are with diabetes.

Dec 28

Concluding My 21 Day Cleanse

New to this site? This is one of 4 posts on my 21 Day Standard Process Purification experience. If you haven’t already, be sure to read the first 3 posts of this series.

Now onto the juicy stuff!img_4308

I feel awesome. I have so much energy and I am the leanest I’ve been in 5 years; at least strongest and body fat percentage. This is a BIG deal. I don’t have the healthiest genes coming into 25 years of type 1 diabetes and just over 2 years with a low thyroid. Weight comes off like molasses, and after doing this program, it seems easy. I better be careful, I am going to be jinxed for saying that!

But I am now convinced. We need to have a liver tune-up annually if not every quarter. The liver really is our fat burning organ, and after concluding this program, I now want to position a cleasne as a priority with my weight loss clients.

img_4301

Concluding Remarks:

  • MEASUREMENTS: So how much weight did I lose? Nearly 5 pounds! I was definitely pleased. While I weighed-in on day 1 and 21, I also thought about doing tape measure measurements, but easily decided I didn’t want to get stuck on any numbers as I went about the program.  I wanted to 1) focus on gaining the most health as possible, 2) not weigh-in during the program at all, and 3) use my appetite and listening skills to zero in on what my body was craving for food choices. If I were to hop on the scale daily, I would have let my dietitian brain take over and dictate my meals. Additionally, I started this program at one of my lowest weights in the last 2 years. Concluding the 3 weeks I was shocked to see I lost any additional weight. No doubt, I am pleased, but I am even happier with how healthy I feel. The only bad news? I really need to break-up with coffee. In the meantime, green tea/matcha is doing the trick.
  • TOOLS: A few things I really valued during this cleanse, besides the obvious sweet potatoes, included:
    • A good blender. I am thankful I had a blender that could liquify everything from beets, carrots to spinach. img_4300
    • A food processor. I used this when I started making pancakes out of the SP protein powder for breakfast,
    • Coconut butter and coconut flakes – maybe a bigger love, over sweet potatoes,
    • Bananas – they always made a smoothie better. I typically used half of a banana or 1/3 of one,
    • Avocados,
    • Raw pumpkin seeds,
    • Fresh herbs and ginger. I loved ginger in the smoothies,
    • The literature provided with the program including the Guide the 1 Degree of Change Cookbook. While I did not obsessively use either, the list of allowed foods was important and I loved looking over recipes just to gather meal ideas.
    • Journaling. Regardless of what program I am doing, tracking how I feel and what I am doing is so powerful. Journaling allowed me to put more faith into the program, noticing the smallest changes, which I believe generated more results. This practice helped me capture the mind-body aspect of this protocol. img_4313
  • ADVICE: For anyone considering this 21 day program, you are in good hands. This cleanse is a real food based program, with food-based supplements and herbs. I was never hungry and the cleanse targeted organ nourishment and support. I feel different and a better version of myself. Be sure to order your product well ahead of time and read the Guide and Cookbook front to back before beginning. This cleanse was honestly easy, but it was only easy because I went into each day having an idea of what foods I was going to put together for my meals and snacks. Batch cooking is key, and forgo the scale and measurements while conducting the detox, so you can use your true senses of what your body needs for fuel and repair. Shop smartly. I bought a lot of the ingredients from Thrive Market, and got wild seafood, protein and vegetables from bargain groceries. I did not have to go to expensive markets to do this program. All in all, no matter what cleanse people do/nutrition coaches recommend, they need to be recommended uniquely. Send me a an email if you want help deciding.
  • MODIFICATIONS: This exact cleanse recommends no animal protein until day 11. I however, would advise clients to do at least day 1-3 with no animal protein, and if able day 1-5. As for eggs, they are not advised, but if someone knows they are no sensitive to them, and will have less stress with the program, to go ahead and include them. The cleanse also suggests one can use quinoa and lentils, and I’d only use those if needed during the vegetarian phase. If able, I’d remove quinoa, lentils and eggs entirely. Lastly, I would not limit fat. I suggest clients use their intuition and appetite in regulating fat intake.
  • DETOXING: In addition to removing many allergens from the diet (dairy. gluten, corn, soy, beans) I incorporated hot yoga, dry brushing, trampoline work and focused on fluids more than what was emphasized with the Guide. I also avoided quinoa.

Day 15 – Like last weekend we went out and stayed up late. With this, I woke with a roaring appetite. I made a pancake out of the cleanse protein powder. If you are curious about such recipes, download the free Standard Process app on your smartphone. In all, the pancake was just what I needed. My Sunday played out as expected.

Day 16 – Monday – feeling lean and mean. Workouts are great and my mind is clear.

Day 17 – Tuesday – I was headed back home from a visit at my sister’s with her and her 3 little boys and my mom. The day went fine, but we stopped at Chipotle for lunch. I abide by the rules with allowed foods, but had the fajita vegetables on a salad with chicken. I should have gone with their pork because it is not cooked with soybean oil, and should have left out the fajita vegetables. They too arimg_4309e cooked in low quality oil and I could feel it. I felt moody and had cravings. As soon as I got home from the long drive, I had a bowl of sweet potato wedges seasoned with coconut oil/butter and sea salt. I closed the night, grounding myself and attended a hot yoga session.

Day 18 – Woke determined to finish strong. I had a pancake I made from the SP protein powder, a shake for lunch and a salad and turkey for dinner. Fish is recommended to be the first animal protein choice, but I went with what I had on hand as were are finishing up some items before we leave town again for Christmas. One really cool thing today – I felt like my workout was on fire. I pushed myself so hard and I was proud of how much weight I lifted and level of intent I put into my exercise. I think I was smiling while I was running too. Maybe it was my food and re-focus on the program, and or I was in the Christmas spirit.

Day 19 – My mind is on the finish line, but also reviewing how I want to carry on after this program. I think I am going to move towards a paleo AIP diet, but I will mix in the SP protein powder for smoothies or pancakes and continue to eat a lower animal protein lunch. I think the way I adapted my lunch during this 21 days was the biggest needle pusher for a better physique and my energy.

Day 20 – A full day of last minute Christmas shopping and enjoying the day and lunch with my mom for her birthday. I did have wine with our date, but I felt fine and I was sure to enjoy it without feeling guilty.

Day 21 – Christmas Eve! I feel great and cheersed the cleanse for everything it gave me.

 

JANUARY CLEANSE – If you are interested in doing a cleanse in the New Year, Standard Process is kicking off their 21 Day Standard Process Purification program with a webinar on the 9th of January, and the diet/supplement regime starts on the 10th. Let me know if you need to order a kit, and I will get you what you need. Their cleanse has dairy free and a standard version (both ~ $235)

This program has a Guide and a full eBook (1 Degree of Change) with step by step meal plans and a free app you can download, which has tracking tools, shopping lists/list builder and recipes from the meal plan.

A lot of information, but all of the above makes the program really easy to follow. Hope you have a healthy New Year and entire 2017 in whatever way you choose to strive for your best health.

For people wanting to do this cleanse in January, be sure to participate in the free weekly webinars. First webinar starts January 9th.

Dec 22

2017 Health Goals

This January I implore you to not make a New Year’s resolution (they don’t last long enough), but to strive to build habits that help you gain on your health year round. Here are a few ideas:

  • Research shows a strong correlation with those who note, lose weight by eating better. This process makes us accountable and I recommend clients use old school pen and paper. This process, verses an app like MyFitnessPal, helps us zero in on our appetite with no calorie counting distractions. Data from the American Journal of Preventive Medicine found those who wrote everything down lost 2x as much weight as those who didn’t. How is that for motivation? A small task can give big results.
  • Pack your meals. When we pack our lunch, we can control the portion size and ingredients. Use the structure of going to an office to your advantage. Having this boundary and packing meals/snack, you can leave your options to healthy ones, even when at home you wouldn’t follow through. For example, my afternoon snack in the office used to 1-2 cups of raw vegetables and nuts. At home, I’d forgo the vegetables and likely eat more nuts, but if I was in an office and was hungry, I’d eat what I had on hand.
  • Make sleep hygiene a priority. When we lock this in, many other healthy habits fall into place. First sleep needs to be appreciated and then it needs nurtured. On average the clocked hours in bed are as appalling as the current obesity rates. This might be common sense, but we will never have more than 24 hours in a day and the best ways to slow down time is to 1) organize ourselves, 2) be mindful (do you ever pause before eating?) and 3) meditate. So back to sleep – as adults we need a bedtime and a bedtime routine, just like children. We shall not abuse caffeine as it not only hurts our sleep it can hurt our hormones. More tips on sleep here. 
  • Move with interest. Likely we can all agree that movement is good, but make sure it’s something you enjoy. Yes, we may judge an interval workout will give a bigger burn than a walk, but if walking is something we really want to do, it benefits the body and the mind. Find new things that excite you, and rotate the activity each month, before it dulls.
  • I am 100% stealing this brilliant idea from one of my favorite podcasts, The Health Bridge. It’s a 100 day Gong, or what can be defined as in Chinese, it’s a designated amount of time to practice a daily task. Data shows a habit takes about 90 days, so this time-frame is a beautiful amount of time to commit to a healthy action. January 1 I am committing to a 100 day Gong to #1) have warm greetings with my husband, and #2) have a 1 sentence gratitude journal. As for warm greetings, this encompasses just that. Rather than yelling to my husbands office, “good-bye” when I am off to an errand, I intend to put in more effort with our departure and my return. What type of task would you like to commit to?
  • Theme/word. What theme or word would you like to empower for 2017? This year I want to be my best self and expect more out of myself. My word for 2017 is, “Rockstar.” I will believe in myself to accomplish more things and to be pleasantly surprised with what I can succeed to.

Life and health is a journey. No need to hold guilt over your head if you fall off track of what you intend. Just aim to take 3 steps forward with less back. Progress is a win.

Cheers to good health and Happy New Year!

Kelly Schmidt, RD, LDN

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